WeAreAllWildlife Installation for WWF

WeAreAllWildlife is the handle of a new World Wildlife Fund (WWF) awareness campaign. On November 24, 2015,  WWF Canada unveiled a unique outdoor installation at 200 King St, Toronto (St. Andrew subway station). The installation featured the handle made of faux money folded into various origami designs by PULP artists.

PULP Artists In Front of WWF # WeAreAllWildlife Origami Installation.

PULP Artists In Front of WWF # WeAreAllWildlife Origami Installation. From left to right – Dylan Johnston, Aileen Ling, Nancy Nguyen, and Rotem Yaniv.

Marking the beginning of a new WWF Canada campaign, #WeAreAllWildlife takes to Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. As WWF Canada CEO David Miller puts it, “to show people across the country that when nature thrives, people and economies thrive.” Visit the WWF blog for more information.

Frog and Waterlily on Lily Pads, PULP Origami for WWF # WeAreAllWildlife Installation.

Frog and Waterlily on Lily Pads, PULP Origami for WWF # WeAreAllWildlife Installation. Photo Credit – Dylan Johnston

When the commission came from Narrative PR, the firm managing the campaign, PULP artists were happy to jump on board. During the month of November, Aileen Ling, Dylan Johnston, Nancy Nguyen, and Rotem Yaniv met every few days to compare origami notes, research new folds on Youtube and Google Images (we found out WWF have their own origami page!), develop the concept, create mock ups, accommodate changes requested by the client, and produce the installation in the tight time-frame the project required. The final piece is made out of more than 400 pieces of folded paper.

Butterflies on Flowers, PULP Origami for WWF # WeAreAllWildlife Installation

Butterflies on Flowers, PULP Origami for WWF # WeAreAllWildlife installation. Photo Credit – Dylan Johnston

Working with WWF seems natural to PULP, as both organizations aim to raise awareness to environmental issues. The idea behind #WeAreAllWildlife specifically – that being environmentally aware can create economic benefits – is especially relevant to PULP’s interest in using discarded materials as a resource. Furthermore, negative environmental impact has direct and indirect negative economic impact. At the end of the day, we as consumers pay for unsustainable manufacturing practices. Oil spill cleanups, severe weather relief, and raw materials scarcity are only a few examples. This is a call for a more environmentally friendly economy – the two are not mutually exclusive.

#WeAreAllWildlife Origami animal

#WeAreAllWildlife Origami animals behind a reflection of the Toronto Financial District (we named the pigeon “Toshi”, because he is a trouble maker).

We were thrilled to meet David Miller, head of WWF Canada at the unveiling ceremony. PULP is looking forward to future artistic projects with them and any other organization that aligns with our agenda.

The installation will be on display until December 1st.
More photos of the installation are available below: